A future, unplanned

For someone who is so stringent in the planning of the minutia of every day life (my Google calendar is filled out down to the hour for the next month) I find it kind of odd how unplanned I’ve left my future.

Now that I’m in my late twenties (there is much debate over whether 27 is middle or late twenties, but I go with the latter; it’s better to be realistic about aging – I think) and about to marry, I’ve been wondering lately if I should give my future a little more structure.

Many couples who enter matrimony have a typical idea of how they want their married life to go. They may set an age for when they want to start a family, or buy a house or maybe they want to change up their careers a bit.Image result for A future, unplanned

Tom and I really don’t have any of those things mapped out.

We don’t plan to have children and although we briefly entertained the idea of buying a house in the next year, there’s really no way in hell we’ll be able to afford real estate in DC anytime soon.

And while I worry that our lack of planning seems irresponsible, I think there’s a nice thrill to the idea of not planning our marriage. Really, there’s no concrete need for us to do so.

Because we’re not going to procreate, we essentially have a blank slate ahead of us as to what we could do with our married life.

We both want to travel as much as our over-extended credit cards will allow. That is a given.

We also want a dog, which will certainly be our version of a child. I really want two dogs and a cat, but as long as we’re still living in a city apartment that probably won’t happen.

We each have our dreams for our careers, and while neither of them are very likely to happen, we’re still young enough to hold on to the hope that they could. And maybe they will, for one or both of us, and then our lives will change dramatically.

Although we both love living in DC, we might eventually leave this place for a warmer one, or one that is more conducive to our careers and not going completely broke by the time we’re 40.

If that does happen, I know I will be incredibly homesick for this city – the first geographical location where I truly felt happy – but will hopefully settle into a new place just as I did here.

Or maybe we’ll live here forever, happily squandering our money in rent.

Who knows?

My planning-oriented mind is a little worried that things aren’t clearly scripted for the next five or ten years, but I’m learning to let it be.

As long as I’m still able to regularly visit my family and friends in Oklahoma, to keep writing even if nothing ever comes of it and can stay true to myself and my relationships, I believe that the future is bright.

Do you have a plan – solid or liquid – for your future?