A future, unplanned

For someone who is so stringent in the planning of the minutia of every day life (my Google calendar is filled out down to the hour for the next month) I find it kind of odd how unplanned I’ve left my future.

Now that I’m in my late twenties (there is much debate over whether 27 is middle or late twenties, but I go with the latter; it’s better to be realistic about aging – I think) and about to marry, I’ve been wondering lately if I should give my future a little more structure.

Many couples who enter matrimony have a typical idea of how they want their married life to go. They may set an age for when they want to start a family, or buy a house or maybe they want to change up their careers a bit.Image result for A future, unplanned

Tom and I really don’t have any of those things mapped out.

We don’t plan to have children and although we briefly entertained the idea of buying a house in the next year, there’s really no way in hell we’ll be able to afford real estate in DC anytime soon.

And while I worry that our lack of planning seems irresponsible, I think there’s a nice thrill to the idea of not planning our marriage. Really, there’s no concrete need for us to do so.

Because we’re not going to procreate, we essentially have a blank slate ahead of us as to what we could do with our married life.

We both want to travel as much as our over-extended credit cards will allow. That is a given.

We also want a dog, which will certainly be our version of a child. I really want two dogs and a cat, but as long as we’re still living in a city apartment that probably won’t happen.

We each have our dreams for our careers, and while neither of them are very likely to happen, we’re still young enough to hold on to the hope that they could. And maybe they will, for one or both of us, and then our lives will change dramatically.

Although we both love living in DC, we might eventually leave this place for a warmer one, or one that is more conducive to our careers and not going completely broke by the time we’re 40.

If that does happen, I know I will be incredibly homesick for this city – the first geographical location where I truly felt happy – but will hopefully settle into a new place just as I did here.

Or maybe we’ll live here forever, happily squandering our money in rent.

Who knows?

My planning-oriented mind is a little worried that things aren’t clearly scripted for the next five or ten years, but I’m learning to let it be.

As long as I’m still able to regularly visit my family and friends in Oklahoma, to keep writing even if nothing ever comes of it and can stay true to myself and my relationships, I believe that the future is bright.

Do you have a plan – solid or liquid – for your future?

Eatin’ & Drinkin’ – Shiki Sushi (also, the dentist sucks)

Isn’t the dentist the worst? Around February I started having tooth pain on the right side of my mouth. I expressed this concern to the dentist and they prescribed two fillings and a night guard. They quoted me a price, and I was on board.

The next time I went in, they decided I needed a crown instead of a filling, but didn’t call it a crown and didn’t tell me that the process would require an additional office visit. It was also $200 more… Okay, whatever. Teeth are important.

So yesterday I went to have the crown put on, and they ask if I’ve had pain. I said yes. So they flipped out to high heaven and were like “well if you’re in PAIN they maybe you need a root canal!”

I was like, well I told you I was in pain a month ago. And you took x-rays and told me I needed other stuff, not including a root canal. Then they were like, well you should probably decide if you want a root canal before we put this crown on.

Now, I don’t know, maybe I just don’t understand how these things work – but I thought it was the dentist, the one with the medical degree, who was supposed to determine whether or not the patient requires a root canal surgery.

Silly me. After a weird conversation concerning the level of pain I was in, they were trying to yank the temporary crown off my tooth without numbing my mouth. Then they put on the crown and didn’t mention the root canal again.

I’m still in pain. And this dentist’s office doesn’t even offer the happy gas.

So that really sucked. And it was expensive. And probably all the work I just had done and paid for will be moot when I have to have the root canal that apparently I must diagnose and order for myself.

I will be going to another dentist though.

Afterward, Tom and I decided sushi was much needed. He had a bad day too. Couple’s emotional eating. Very romantic.

When I first moved to the DC area, several bloggers told me that the best sushi was at a place in the Ballson Common Mall called Shiki Sushi. I was skeptical at first, but after my first visit, I was a believer. I’ve tried a lot of other, fancier, places in DC since but nothing has compared.

We tried a new-to-us dish – the spicy tuna gratin. I actually thought this was going to be another sushi roll, so I was surprised when it came out as a casserole. Surprised, but not disappointed. It was a sushi version of tuna casserole, but without any of that nasty canned tuna fishy taste. So good.

SO good.

We also ordered our favorite Shiki roll, the dynamite roll, along with a California roll and a spicy yellowtail roll.

The dynamite roll is seriously insane. The scallops are so fresh and tender. The rest of the sushi was amazing as well. Yellowtail is only good when it’s practically just out of the water fresh, and this was.

So, if you’ve had a bad day recently, or just have a sushi craving – don’t underestimate this little gem in Ballston. It’s never crowded, and it’s in one of the saddest malls in the area, but somehow it still manages to be the best.

HAPPY WEEKEND!

Happy Weekend!  It’s extra happy for me because I took Monday off as well.  We don’t have too much planned.  While my hunny is at work on Saturday, I have a pre-natal checkup in the morning and will probably catch up on my TV shows in the afternoon (Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal, Bones – to name a few).  Maybe some decluttering – who knows? Sunday we’re going to go check out a new store that opened up recently and then we have some errands to run on Monday.  All in all it should be a relaxed weekend.


I really enjoyed this article about couples that don’t fight (often).  When I started my relationship with R, I definitely wanted it to be different than ones from the past – and fighting was definitely a thing I wanted to work on, if for no one but myself.  I think it has really helped our relationship to weather the storms.  Granted we aren’t perfect.  Some of the bullet points in the article are still items I need to work on, but I can definitely relate to it.

See you Monday (or wait, maybe Tuesday still I’ll still be “weekend-ing”)

RECIPE: Seasoned Edamame

Hey all!! Today I’m hanging out on Julie Ann Art (go check out my popsicle recipes!)

On Monday I guest posted for Jessica at Jessica Who? and today I’m sharing the post with my readers as well.  We’re talking edamame! (or soybeans) We’re creating a dish that is flavored with a local style Asian sauce.  This is a favorite snack in Hawaii.  It is SO popular, that it is offered (instead of bread) at Roy’s Restaurant (a popular upscale restaurant from the islands) as your drink order is taken.

You’ll love this simple recipe because each layer of flavor blends beautifully together and it is a tasty pupu (or appetizer) that graces dinner party tables and Football Sunday snack tables alike.

INGREDIENTS:

2 cups soybeans, cooked (follow package directions)

1 tsp sesame oil

2 cloves garlic, finely minced (or grated)

1/2 tsp ginger, skin removed and finely minced (or grated)

2 tbsp shoyu (soy sauce)

2 tbsp water

1 tbsp rice vinegar

1 jigger of fish sauce (Tiparos)

1 tbsp brown sugar

1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes

DIRECTIONS:

In a prep bowl (or other small bowl), mix the shoyu, water, rice vinegar, fish sauce brown sugar and pepper flakes.  Heat the sesame oil in a small pot or saucepan over medium heat.  Once heated, add the garlic and ginger and let cook for 1-2 minutes.  Keep the garlic and ginger moving to avoid burning.  Add in the shoyu mixture and stir often until the sauce reduces to a glaze, about 5-7 minutes.  You can simmer for a shorter or longer amount of time based on the preferred consistency of the glaze/sauce.

Toss the sauce together with the soybeans and serve.  Serve hot or cold.

If you think you can handle the heat, add in a 1/4 tsp (extra) of red pepper flakes, your mouth (my mouth) was BLAZING HOT!!

Guess what?  On Jessica’s site we’re doing a giveaway as well!! So head on over and enter to win a fabulous Hawaiian Care Package curated by yours truly!! 🙂